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heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> before brown versus board of education, there was another directive by harry s. truman which banned diskrcrimination o anyone in the military regard l regardless of race, creed or religious beliefs. it with was a historical truth that the u.s. military described as an engine of war by progressives has been a leading institution for fight for racial equality, and because the military leaders carry great weight with many americans, i thought i would remind one american in particular just where the military stands on a decision he will be making very soon. my letter this week is to supreme court chief justice john roberts as he considers a challenge to the affirmative action program at the university of texas. dear chief justice roberts, it is me, e melissa. remember last june you were the deciding vote to uphold the affordable health care act, yeah? well, that was a cool way to ensure the legacy and in truth, it gave me faith that despite your ideologically derived positions and the willingness to overturn established preced
education. got a new department of education. >> host: at what point do you become for the civil rights commission would become a permanent agency in a sense? >> guest: after the first year , what the commission did this instead of sitting down seine which is here as a safety valve, they different hearings. the major power the commission had an ipod this in the book continues the most important thing. when it does what it's supposed to do, it will go out and listen to people nobody else will listen to. the civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention. not just local people, but the federal government would write letters. nobody would pay attention. the civil rights commission decided they would go out of that they had decided and they had the power under the statute to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i want to get it passed by congress to set up an executive orders because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. some people may not want to come to testify, said the commission has the most important
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
of diseases, to what extent have been noticed efforts to educate the human population on how to modify their lifestyle so it is better to avoid the crossover and spillover? >> there are certainly efforts. in bangladesh they're trying to educate people not to drink raw date palm staff that contains a virus. if you put the stuff you can kill the virus but people like to drink it raw. it is a tradition, a seasonal treat so there are things like that around the world. in southern china they crack down on the big what markets, at least above ground, and big wedge markets, sold live for food as a fashion in southern china, they call it wild flavor, a vote for eating wild life, not because people need the protein for subsistence, they have some money and this is considered a very robust and tasty food. one other thing on that in terms of education, of local people, i mentioned the original spillover, pandemic strain in southeastern cameron, i went to retrace probably the route it took coming out of southeastern cameron and down a river system that came along the main stem condo and eventually
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
liberal education system as well as a very liberal media in general. my expectation with kids coming out of high school or college this sort of seem to think the government just passed the money and gives it out. if they don't seem to realize until much later in life that they're taking my money and giving it out. so i think it's an educational problem, much deeper than whether a candidate is running in a particular town. thanks for c-span. host: peter, thanks for the call. guest: conservatives have a lot of work to do in the media and in education. the media situation is a lot more balanced than 20 years ago or 30 years ago. a couple of major newspapers and magazines have collapsed. young people can access a ton of points of view and a lot of data and information and that is a healthy thing. people complain about the internet and all of these blogs and what happened to the good old days when you had serious editors manning the phones? i think the current situation is much healthier for a vigorous democracy and there's a lot of good stuff out there. if we have a piece on our website, a w
cost of whenever you're buying. with us now, consumer education president, smart credit dot com. the president of optimum capital management. great to have you both year. al start with you. what do you make of this? >> this is really bad news for consumers. we are already getting nickel-and-dimed to death, and we are about to get even worse. essentially, the fee that the market had -- merchant has to pay to exit the credit card, cone -- commonly called a slight fee, in the past they have not been able to charge a line-item extra cost to the consumer to cover that. starting this sunday will be allowed to. that is the bad news. they have already baked in that she in the price of the merchandise the you're buying. so now not only unable to charge a fee on top of what you're already purchasing, but essentially paying the fee to times over, and those of us to pay cash are really getting screwed because we're still paying the fee for people using credit cards. gerri: i want to show people some of the details. sunday, storms have to inform customers if you're an online merchant as well
to have the children they want, to educate the children they had and keep them safe. so it really has to do with, how do we define women in our society? are they full and equal participants? and the best way, the seemingly sort of neutral way of undermining their personhood, is to focus on the issue of abortion. >> for us, our slogan is "health, dignity, and justice." and when you think about compulsory pregnancies, it's taking away health, dignity, and justice from a woman. many of the women, the latinas that we work with that have experienced abortion are in their 20s, have a child already, and are -- >> and why do they want an abortion? >> because they're not in an economic situation they -- >> they can't afford a second child? >> they perhaps can't afford a second child, they want to go to school, they might be at a point in their career. the reasons range, quite frankly. it's really important that women that we work with, mostly latina, immigrant, women of color, those at the margins, low income, are able to access their rights in a way without barriers and further bureaucratic o
school education. at 70 she centralled back to college, while travelling from a college library, she was at a bus stop, a guy came along, mugged her and tried to rape her. at that point, i decided that, i was going to make sure that every female in my family had the tools they need to protect themselves, groupon is targeting lawful gun ownership in this country. i've had enough. i'm sick of everything that is going on in media and news and dc, and congress and is a sayi, only thing they are doing is targeting lawful gun ownership. people are their time out of their busy schedule to take a 10 hour course, to learn gun save the to learn the law that surrounds the firearms and we're punishing these open, i say now, i'm not going to do, that my name is michael cargil, and i say boycott groupon. lou: michael cargil, from central texas. thank you. i bet he knows some folks to pro for you to in other parts of can the runty. -- of the country, michael, come back soon, will you. >> thank you, sir, i sure will. lou: when are record revenues just not enough? when wall street wants more, apple
are overeducated for the jobs that are available but not educated for the jobs that are open? >> we have had this problem probably for the last two to three 24 or five years where people are running now the cost of a college education is worth it in the long run because the jobs that are available are not the middle-market job. every highly professional jobs or the hourly jobs. we run call centers and folks taking phone calls, it is certainly not what they probably intended to do. melissa: every job is a great job, more power to you. this entire affair settled with the kind of college debt you thought would bring with it a higher paying job and you now can afford to make student loan payments, it is not a great thing. are you hiring right now? are you looking for folks? >> quite frankly kind of candidates i received just aren't qualified. they have the wrong types of degrees. melissa: give us an example. >> if you have computer science, computer engineering, we will hire you in a split second. tons of companies we can literally start with six-figure salary out of the gate if you have web dev
that we protect children, but we also need to extend that obviously to higher education. what chris said was well-said which is that campuses should be a place where a student like the one on that phone call should be able to go and study english and not worry about having to dive under her desk or, you know, behind corners of the building to avoid getting injured seriously. so, you know, i'm on the education and workforce committee. we actually just met this afternoon. the chairman of the committee, mr. klein from minnesota, a republican, made a pledge that we are going to be holding hearings on school violence, and, you know, i'm trying to be an optimist that, you know, the president's words yesterday, the willingness in the house to actually have these issues brought up for consideration, are going to produce some real results that will make this a safer country. >> because this is a public health problem, isn't it? i mean, gun violence is, you know, no less significant in its impact than public health issues like obesity in this country. i mean, this is just out of control, isn't it?
is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills and that they learn these skills, we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry on "after words" on c-span2. look for more booktv online. like us on facebook. >> british prime minister david cameron says that if the conservative party is returned to power at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happe
of education, research and development, innovation energy. there are things we can do about it but we have to do them together as a country. that's our goal. >> i do think it's important to put in context and remember just how dark the days were four years ago and how in the middle of that meltdown, people were thinking about going to caves and getting spam and guns. it was dark. not only the president, but the president working with george w. bush and others really pitched in and had to make very tough decisions and a lot of hard votes that got a lot of people unelected from office to get us through that. >> when we got our first economic briefings, i wanted to get some spam and go into a cave. i know what you're talking about. >> that's why this is such an opportunity, though, for the president right now. the problems we're talking about are structural. they've been there for a long time. this declining middle class has gone on for two decades. it isn't just the recession. that means investing. this is where the problem of the debt comes in. if you're going to get bet
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
tries to buy such as college education, health care, many things that are more costly today than they were 30 years ago. it's very, very difficult. you're almost measuring or comparing apples and oranges. >> are you then conceding all the people say wages have been stagnant for 30 or 40 years that that number is wrong. >> no, no, it's not absolutely wrong. i'm saying that there's a big debate over the deflator, what we're using to measure real incomes and inflation adjusted incomes and the debate centers on whether technologies are accurately included in all of that. >> if you have that number wrong, then the argument falls apart. so instead of having flat wages which by the way doesn't take into account the full compensation someone gets such as fringe benefits but focusing on the wages if that part of the argument is wrong then whole thing is wrong. >> wait, wait, wait. wait, wait, wait that's not all wrong. >> if i could finish my point please. the actual number is between 30% and 40% over that period not flat therefore your argument and the argument of the left and center peo
is asking a state mediator to step in. >> u.s. department of education announce today that every public school child in america will now have to, ever ever public school will include students with disability in the after school sports program. education reporter lee ann explains how this will change the playing field. >>reporter: about fancy foot work gained her a spot on the school soccer team. also plays for a club. so we were surprised when she showed us her prosthetic leg. >> this is the liner. and inside here it's just hollow. >>reporter: her school in berkeley encourages all students including those with disabilities to try out for any sport. >> they treat me like a regular kid. nothing different about me except for my leg. i can just deal with that. >>reporter: in some cases the school makes the proper accommodations. >> child hearing impaired we may need visual cue where there might be a buzz error gun or something else for a child that needs association that needs to be put into place. >>reporter: will lard already doing a lot of what the u.s. department of education w
education and mobilization project state by state to let legislators know they can't continue to do this without paying a price. >> john: i wonder if they read today's poll results. in your column today you wrote that we don't live in a roe world, we live in a casey world. could you explain what you mean by that and how that really empowers conservative legislatures to pass these kind of laws? >> all of the restrictions that terry referred to, the door to them was opened in the 1992 decision planned parenthood versus casey which celebrated its own anniversary last year and while people were happy that that didn't overturn roe v. wade which was the fear at the time, what happened was they said you could basically pass any kind of restriction on abortion as long as it didn't outright ban it before viability. as a result, anything the court doesn't consider an undue burden can stand. that's basically out how federal counties which as you know, are stacked with many conservatives and obama has not made a ton of judicial appointments to them, these are the courts -- what is considered a
. this is renowned author, educator and political activist angela davis who spoke last night, founder of the group critical resistance, a grassroots effort to in the prison industrial complex. davis voiced support for president obama, the said much work needs to be done. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential the agendas. our passionate support for president barack obama and it is wonderful that we can say for the second time, president barack obama, and we support him and are passionate about that support. but that support should also be expressed in our determination to raise issues that have largely been ignored or not appropriately addressed by the administration. and let me say that we are aware that we should be celebrating, critically celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. [applause] there should be massive celebrations this year. what has happened other than the film "lincoln"? and of course with 2.5 million people behind bars today, the prison system, the immigrant detention system are terrible remain
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
was made, we were not informed of the board. i sit on the board of education. we were not informed that we would be having these weapons purchased and then they would be stored--there are conflicting reports, we don't know. if they're going to be stored on the school sites, which is the information that i got from the superintendent, or they're transported back and forth from the police department office to the different schools. we still don't know. my thing is they should not be at the schools, number one. number two, we should have had an opportunity to vet this issue with the board of education as well as the community. they should have had some input as to whether we wanting to this route. >> cenk: i want to talk about both of those issues. first in terms of whether it's going to work. there are a couple of argument they will be deterred because we have assault rifles, and then two, they're disturbed and they kill themselves. they're disturbed any way. now when i was in school. you have to understand that i was a massive dork and i once broke into the school. i would have gotten 20 ye
so much from education to climate change to gun control to all sorts of stuff. the big question tonight is what can he actually prioritize and what can he actually make happen? where do you think his real priorities lie? >> he did a wonderful job today. he helped renew, rekindle the american spirit, calling us to what has always made america great, all of us working together to forge a stronger america, and he laid out his agenda. one of economic competitiveness and investing in education, and he put climate change on the line for the first time in a long time. as well as immigration reform, talking about immigration and how they're going to replenish america. it's not going to bei easy to gt any of those thing s done, but these are the types of moments that bring americans together and there's real hope in that. >> what about if the president has to choose? gun control -- marco rubio on the republican side, putting forth, it fits well with what the president has to say. >> i think immigration reform is easier. that doesn't mean it's less important, but it's easier, gun safety a
? highway system. transportation system. public education system. goes back to the articles of confederation. states will make that kind of decision. not everyone has the permanent me an basin that texas has to fund its education system. there will be some give-and-take. melissa: that is the flip side. states down the road do away with taxes, does the state fall apart? >> we independent fall apart. we had to figure out a way to pay for the highway patrol. i think that states are searching for a balance. i think, good thing that can come out of this budget debate, both the state level and local level, what really can government do constructively and how much are we willing to pay to have them do it. melissa: yeah. >> deal with the past pension problems that are a big part of the state is the money they didn't spend in the past because they promised to spend in the future. big problem. states will have to figure out how to deal with that locality. this is a healthy debate i think. melissa: dave, give you the last word. do you agree with that? >> i do agree with that. i think the opportunity is
of this over a period of years. and her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it's very much in its time that we can teach people certain skills. >> the dark side of the personal finances industry saturday night at 10:00 on afterwards on c-span2. and look for more book tv online. like us on facebook. >> but i think it's all an evolutionary process. you grow into this role. and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you are always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues that you care about. you're never done. so there is never a point in time where you feel like i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. it's changes given the state of the country and you don't know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and open to involve. >> the first ladies their public and private lives. >> c-span is teaming up for a series for television, first ladies influence and image airing over two seasons. season one begins president's day at 9:00 eastern
. education he simply said education, as if saying education or saying economy means prosperity, and education means knowledge. it doesn't. and the frustrating thing is, he's not leading on these issues. >> alisyn: as you said, unemployed today is 7.8%, the same as what it was when president obama took office, the real number, i don't have to tell you is much higher. people who are underemployed and they don't have this job in their career track. >> we'll put that number in some context. labor force participation the same as when he took office in 2009, that it's above 65%, that number would be-- well, be almost 10 1/2%. 10 1/2% and include those discouraged and left the workplace, the number rises to the 14.4%. >> alisyn: 14 1/2, right. lou dobbs we'll watch you on the fox business network. >> you have a deal. thanks, good to see you. >> alisyn: a growing scandal in ohio after investigation that the largest school district finds 53,000 final grades for students were changed from failing to passing. wait until you hear who is apparently behind this and why. and a terrified woman escapes a kidn
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
and pay higher wages and improving education and job training so that more people can get the skills that businesses are looking for. it means reforming our immigration system and keeping our children safe from the menace of gun violence. and it means bringing down our deficit in a balanced way by making necessary reforms and asking every american to pay their fair share. >> meanwhile, republicans stressing their agenda today as well. cutting spending. >> our nation's total debt is now larger than our entire economy. this means that every man, woman and child owes a $53,000 share of this debt. that level of spending is unsustainable. a major credit rating agency has already downgraded our nation's credit once. and if we don't start making some real progress on spending reforms, more downgrades are likely in the near future. >> about eight minutes past the hour now. live look this is happening in washington, d.c. as we speak. this is happening really across the country. one of the main ones, this is a rally for gun control taking place in washington, d.c. people there are rallying for
with cory booker to tackle education reform in newark's public schools, mark zuckerberg is opening his palo alto hotel to chris christie's reelection campaign. why is mark zuckerberg doing this? liz: he is tough on education, donated $100 million to newark's schools and is getting blasted on the internets despite the fact he posted a town hall for the president and attended a dinner for the president in silicon valley. stuart: he is a liberal, chris christie not so sure. charles: chris christie is a new age bloomberg hybrid, he has crushed these republicans. if he was nice to president obama and moved the election he is something of a hybrid have republican half democrat, maybe that is what we want. stuart: jerry brown says everything is rosy, but it is balanced, it is a model for the nation. next, why that is back on street. he is on fantasy island. ou turn? maybe you want to incorporate a business. orrotect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answ
was supposed to just go strictly for education and now, of course, we have learned only half of it, maybe less will go toward education. shep. >> shepard: he could move, i suppose. and there is a welcome mat out for him. >> oh, yeah. the texas governor rick perry from no tax, texas has said he would put the welcome mat out in a tweet i'm quoting here hey phil, texas is home to liberty and low taxes. we would love to have you as well. phil's long time rival on the golf course tiger woods also a california native. tiger says the reason he left california back in 1996 is because of taxes. a move that saved him well over $100 million. the experts say even the rich are keeping track. listen. >> we're under the impression if a person has 10 they won't miss three. if that person is earning that money, i assure you they will miss every single dime. >> others have a different view. syracuse professor wrote and i'm quoting please stop whining and give thanks for being able to earn a fabulous living playing a game and selling golf clubs even after tax 99 pulp the 99% of people would never have that optio
litigate around the country and to public education on lgbt and hiv-r elated rights issues. host: republican line. gloria, good morning. caller: good morning, gentlemen. thank you for taking my call to my family is six generations and the great state of california, and we have seen many changes take place, especially with regard to the issues that are on your program today. i am sure you probably know that in the 1950's, the greektown of san diego -- not san diego, san francisco, passed the ordinance to protect homosexuals from being attacked. you would go to jail if you beat someone out or when after someone and cause them harm because of their sexual preference. but we've also seen in the great state of california this issue turned into a mainly a white, very well established, male- dominated issue. the men who are gay in this state are not pork, they are not an agitated, and they -- not poor, not uneducated, and they are long on opportunity. i think the issue of not allowing people to have a say on what their preference is is a difficult and unpleasant hill to swallow. we've
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
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